Community Celebrates Grand Opening of Opportunity Campus in West Louisville

Crowds gathered Tuesday to inaugurate the Goodwill Industries of Kentucky and Norton Healthcare partnership designed to bring a campus of opportunity and hospital to the Parkland neighborhood. It will be the first hospital to be built west of Ninth Street in over 100 years. “We know West Louisville has been let down too many times and we don’t want it to take five years and wonder if it’s ever going to happen,” says Goodwill CEO Amy Luttrell. “It’s going to happen.” Organizations have invested over $100 million in a 20-acre lot on 28th and Broadway, to be the future home of Goodwill’s corporate headquarters, new hospital, and local service agencies.These local agencies include, but are not limited to , Big Brothers Big Sisters, KentuckianaWorks, Volunteers of America, the YMCA, University of Louisville College of Dentistry, Kentucky College of Barbering, and many others.Tyasia Brown, a student at Kentucky College of Barbering, is one of many people who are proud to be a part of the new facility.”He has a lot of resources for people in this community who may not be able to make that trip to get their hair cut or their teeth checked,” said D Brown. the services will help benefit the community – especially the hair salons, which Brown says help deepen students’ skills while also having a reputation as a safe haven in communities. “You can talk to them about their problems and they come away with a new haircut and a smile on their face,” Brown said. their lives today.'” The new $70 million Norton West Louisville Hospital will also impact lives. “People can’t afford health care,” said Jacquay White, a Goodwill employee. White says the importance of this hospital in the Parkland neighborhood gives people “somewhere to go. These facilities. Their partnership is expected to bring hundreds of jobs and millions in funds to the area. Norton CEO Healthcare, Russell Cox, said it was the next step in health equity “Together we are turning the page on health equity, right here at 28th Broadway,” said Cox.” This is the real opportunity on how we should measure success. ” The effort p or improving inclusion in healthcare is also accompanied by an effort to improve inclusion in employment opportunities. The project plans to hire minority-owned contractors, with a black-owned architectural firm executing the vision. “We’ve come together to celebrate something that I think will break down barriers,” said Devon Holt of Goodwill. “But it’s not a building that will do this, it’s individuals who will achieve it.” West Louisville residents will have the opportunity to learn more about the project at a community forum, to be held July 26 at the Norton Healthcare Sports and Learning Center, located at 3029 W Muhammed Ali Blvd., at 6 p.m.

Crowds gathered Tuesday to inaugurate the Goodwill Industries of Kentucky and Norton Healthcare partnership designed to bring a campus of opportunity and hospital to the Parkland neighborhood.

It will be the first hospital to be built west of Ninth Street in over 100 years.

“We know West Louisville has been let down too many times and we don’t want it to take five years and wonder if it’s ever going to happen,” said Amy Luttrell, CEO of Goodwill. “It will happen.”

The organizations have invested more than $100 million in a 20-acre lot on 28th and Broadway, to be the future home of Goodwill’s corporate headquarters, new hospital, and local service agencies.

These local agencies include, but are not limited to, Big Brothers Big Sisters, KentuckianaWorks, Volunteers of America, YMCA, University of Louisville College of Dentistry, Kentucky College of Barbering, and many others.

Tyasia Brown, a student at Kentucky College of Barbering, is one of many people proud to be part of the new facility.

“He has a lot of resources for people in this community who might not be able to make that trip to get their hair cut or their teeth checked,” Brown said.

Bringing in local services will benefit the community — especially hair salons, which Brown says help build student skills while also having a reputation as a safe haven in communities.

“You can tell them about their issues and they walk away with a new haircut and a smile on their face,” Brown said. “You leave school and say, ‘I may have had an impact on their life today. “”

The new $70 million Norton West Louisville Hospital will also have an impact on life.

“People can’t afford health care,” said Goodwill employee Jacquay White.

White says the prominence of this hospital in the Parkland neighborhood gives people “a place to go.”

The plan of these organizations is to change the paradigm around care and access with these facilities. Their partnership is expected to bring hundreds of jobs and millions in funds to the region.

Norton Healthcare CEO Russell Cox says this is the next step towards health equity.

“Together, we are turning the page on health equity, right here on 28th Broadway,” Cox said. “This is the real opportunity on how we should measure success.”

The effort to improve inclusion in health care is also accompanied by an effort to improve inclusion in employment opportunities. The project plans to hire minority-owned contractors, with a black-owned architectural firm executing the vision.

“We’ve come together to celebrate something that I think will break down barriers,” said Devon Holt of Goodwill. “But it’s not a building that will do that, it’s individuals that will make it happen.”

West Louisville residents will have the opportunity to learn more about the project at a community forum, to be held July 26 at the Norton Healthcare Sports and Learning Center, located at 3029 W Muhammed Ali Blvd., at 6 p.m. .

Lillian L. Pena